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Wednesday, April 3
 

8:00am

Current Issues in Business Archives
This daylong meeting will focus on two important topics in business archives today, electronic records and storytelling. The meeting will be broken up into two sessions: electronic records in the morning and storytelling in the afternoon. Moderators will lead each session in a collaborative, shared learning environment. Each moderator will give a brief presentation on various aspects of the topics and then lead the group in discussion and sharing so you can learn from each other.

Speakers
SG

Stephanie Giordano

Rotary International
avatar for Scott Grimwood

Scott Grimwood

SSM Health
DM

Dave Moore

Carhartt
avatar for Jennifer Johnson

Jennifer Johnson

Corporate Archives Director, Cargill Incorporated
Jennifer Johnson is the Director of the Corporate Archives at Cargill, Incorporated. A University of Maryland graduate, she previously worked at the U.S. Department of Energy and the Minnesota State Archives. Jennifer has held leadership positions with SAA, MAC, and TCART, and is... Read More →
TR

Ted Ryan

Ford Motor Company
JS

Jennifer Sirotkin

Chick-fil-A, Inc.
ML

Martha Lawrence

Chick-fil-A, Inc.
avatar for Hathaway Hester

Hathaway Hester

Manager, Association Archives, National Association of REALTORS®
Hathaway Hester is the Manager of the Association Archives at the National Association of REALTORS® in Chicago. She was co-chair of the 2018 MAC Local Arrangements Committee in Chicago and has served on MAC's Education Committee for the past three years. In addition, she's proud... Read More →


Wednesday April 3, 2019 8:00am - 4:30pm
Ambassador 1
  • Price $50
  • Attendance 30-50
 
Thursday, April 4
 

8:00am

Council Meeting
Thursday April 4, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Cadillac A

8:00am

Records and Information Management: The Archivist’s Loyal Friend
This workshop will provide an overview of the field of records and information management (RIM) and its important relationship to the archival profession. The instructor will cover how the functions of RIM professionals are changing in today’s digital environment and discuss the challenges presented by the shift from paper-based to digital-only recordkeeping practices. The instructor will lay out the fundamental elements of a records and information management program including
  • Identifying and conducting an assessment of business functions
  • Developing retention schedules
  • Creating training resources
  • Offering records storage options
  • Building strong ties with the archives
  • Maintaining institutional support
You will have the opportunity to work on drafting a plan to create or enhance an existing RIM program for your own institution.
Who Should Attend?
This workshop should be of interest to anyone who wants to provide guidance on identifying records that should/should not come to the archives or to those interested in building support for an RIM program.
What Should You Know Already?
You should have at least a basic understanding and appreciation for the business value of records.

Instructor
JK

Joanne Kaczmarek

Director of Records and Information Management Services and Archivist for Electronic Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday April 4, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Nicolet A Conference hotel
  • Price $50
  • Attendance 30-35

8:00am

Text and Data Mining Basics for Beginners Using Open Source, Off-the-Shelf Tools
Digital humanists and historians are expanding the use of digitized materials in new and exciting directions. As the availability of large collections of OCR-ed documents and associated metadata become available, researchers interested in using computational algorithms to find patterns across hundreds or even thousands of documents look to archives not only to understand these methods, but also to provide documents and corpuses for analysis. In this workshop, you will get your feet wet in the theory and methods of text and data mining, preview an off-the-shelf tool that performs text mining on a set of documents, and discover how to translate knowledge of these new research methods into strategies and programs that extend digital collections to new audiences. You are encouraged to bring your own laptops to participate in hands-on exercises.
Who Should Attend?
Anyone curious or interested in text and data mining research methods. No coding skills required!
What Should You Know Already?
No text mining experience necessary

Instructor
AS

Alexandra Sarkozy

Instructor, Wayne State University


Thursday April 4, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Nicolet B Conference hotel
  • Price $50
  • Attendance 30

8:30am

Benson Ford Research Center and Main Storage Building, The Henry Ford
Visit one of the Detroit area’s oldest and largest cultural institutions with a tour of archival, library and museum storage at The Henry Ford in nearby Dearborn! Dedicated in 1929, and celebrating its 90th anniversary during 2019, The Henry Ford is home to more than a million 3D artifacts and over 50,000 linear feet of archival and library materials that together help tell stories America’s traditions of ingenuity, resourcefulness and innovation. The first half of the tour will feature the archival and library storage areas located in the Benson Ford Research Center and highlight unique items from those holdings including the historic business records of the Ford Motor Company, an extensive Trade Catalog collection, and automotive and industrial design materials. In the second half of the tour, the group will visit the recently opened Main Storage Building, which is quickly becoming the new home for The Henry Ford’s large collection of automobiles, as well as providing processing and storage spaces for 2D and 3D objects and collections. Please note: considerable walking will be required on the tour. Transportation will be provided, leaving from and returning to the conference hotel.


  • Price $5
  • Attendance 24

8:45am

Black Bottom & Paradise Valley Walking Tour (approx. 3 miles)
The Lower eastside of Detroit, home to Eastern Market, Lafayette Park, and the Islandview neighborhood is one of the most historically significant neighborhoods in Detroit's history. The history includes the Indigenous Anishinaabe people who lived there before Europeans arrived in Detroit. It also is important when the French arrive in 1701. The French farmers would name the area "Fond Noir" - Black Bottom. But its importance for African Americans in Detroit is what this neighborhood is most known for. This part of Detroit was the neighborhood with the most concentrated population of African Americans from the 1800s to the 1950s.

Slated to receive a Michigan Historical Marker this year, and the subject of books, research projects and the Black Bottom Street View project by Emily Kutil, Black Bottom has been a major topic of interest in the past few years! Before Greektown, Corktown, and Poletown, this was the home of many European ethnic groups - Irish, Jewish, German, Italians, Polish, and of course, African Americans.
Please join historian, educator and Tour Leader of Black Scroll Network History and Tours, Jamon Jordan on a tour of what was Black Bottom, the historic African American neighborhood that was destroyed by federal, state, and local policymakers.

We will also visit the site of Paradise Valley, the African American business and entertainment district that was destroyed by the building of the I-375 & I-75 freeway.

The tour will include a visit to historic homesites, schools, houses of worship and businesses.

Meet LAC representative in the hotel lobby, will depart at 8:45 am.

Thursday April 4, 2019 8:45am - 12:00pm
Conference Hotel 400 Renaissance Dr W, Detroit, MI 48207, USA
  • Price $5
  • Attendance 14

9:00am

Detroit Institute of Arts Research Library & Archives and Museum (shuttle)
The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 65,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. Notable acquisitions include the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), and The Wedding Dance (Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1566).  The DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range and depth. We will start with a behind-the scenes tour of the DIA Research Library & Archives, one of the largest museum libraries in the nation. The tour will include highlights from our collection of primary sources and rare books, and a walk through of our storage spaces. The visit to the Research Library & Archives will be followed by a short docent-led tour of the museum, to include Rivera Court and our world-renowned Detroit Industry Murals.
Meet LAC representative in the hotel lobby, shuttle will depart at 9:10 am, return by 12:30 pm


Thursday April 4, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm
Detroit Institute of Arts 5200 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
  • Price FREE
  • Attendance 25

9:00am

Walter P. Reuther Library and Burton Historical Collection (shuttle)
This tour offers a look at not, one, but two Detroit historical repositories, located just across the street from each other! 

The Reuther Library is the largest labor archives in North America and is home to the collections of numerous unions and labor-related organizations. Its collection strengths extend to the political and community life of urban and metropolitan Detroit, the civil rights movement in Michigan and nationally, and women’s struggles in the workplace. The Reuther Library is also the home of the Wayne State University Archives, established s in 1958. The Reuther has a capacity of 75,000 linear feet of archival materials spanning these three collection areas, as well as extensive audiovisual and digital collections. The tour will offer behind-the-scenes access to processing and storage areas as well as to examples from some of the archives’ most-used collections, such as the UFW Office of the President: Cesar Chavez Records, the Walter P. Reuther Papers, Mayors Jerome Cavanagh and Coleman Young Papers, midcentury architect Minoru Yamasaki Papers, and organizational records such as those of the Jewish Community Archives, the Detroit Commission on Community Relations, Focus: HOPE, and more.

The Burton Historical Collection, located in the beautiful Main Branch of the Detroit Public Library, was established in 1915 with the donation of the private library of Clarence Monroe Burton, a prominent attorney and Detroit historiographer. Burton’s collecting focused on the early history of Detroit, Michigan, and the Northwest Territory from the time of the French traders through the early twentieth century. The Burton Historical Collection has continued to grow and now proudly offers to the public more than 500,000 books, 250,000 images, 4,000 manuscript collections, and about 1,000 newspaper titles covering about 400 years of North American history with a heavy focus on Detroit, but also including more geographically distant events like the Salem Witch Trials and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The tour will include a guided walk through the Burton Reading Room, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at materials located in the closed stacks.

Meet LAC representative in lobby, shuttle will depart at 9:10am, return by 12:30 pm.

Thursday April 4, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm
Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University 5401 Cass Ave., Detroit, MI 48202
  • Price FREE
  • Attendance 30

10:00am

Detroit Mural Project (approx. 3 miles)
Join our plenary speaker, Viranel Clerard, founder and curator of the Detroit Mural Project, on a walking tour through downtown Detroit’s art landscape. Detroit has become one of the most vibrant centers of street art in the country. Hundreds of murals from some of the most famous street artists in the world, and gifted local artists now grace Downtown, Eastern Market, Southwest Detroit, and the Grand River corridor. Bringing an inspired jolt of creativity, street art illuminates the civic and ethnic identity of Detroit’s neighborhoods. Street art is a metaphor and a manifestation, promising a better future, while breathing life into the city. The tour will examine Detroit’s transformation through the resurgence of authorized and unauthorized street art. Viranel Clerard will provide a guided tour through Detroit’s art history and culture.

Group will meet in the hotel lobby with LAC representatives at 9:00 am.

Thursday April 4, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Conference Hotel 400 Renaissance Dr W, Detroit, MI 48207, USA
  • Price $5
  • Attendance 14

12:30pm

MAC Pals Reception
MAC Pals, come to a reception to meet up with your pal. This informal program matches Annual Meeting veterans with first-time attendees and helps newcomers make the most of their time at the conference.

Thursday April 4, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Michelangelo Room

1:30pm

Plenary - Viranel Clerard
Viranel Clerard, a community art advocate and photojournalist, is an educator for the Heidelberg Arts Leadership Academy, and founder of the Detroit Mural Project; a digital catalog of 1000+ public art murals in the city of Detroit. With an Iphone and a passion for Detroit’s art scene, Clerard devotes his time between jobs to the curation of the Detroit Mural Project; illuminating historical evidence of Detroit’s narrative in a rapidly changing landscape. Born in Hudson, NY and raised on the eastside of Detroit to two Haitian immigrants, Viranel Clerard worked his way from the ground up to a front-page writer of the Detroit News. In 2013, Clerard moved to Ann Arbor, MI to pursue a degree in Fine Art at U-M’s Penny Stamps School of Art & Design; where he learned the importance of working collaboratively and developing strong social networks. In 2015, he left U-M to create the Detroit Mural Project, now one of the largest and most ambitious region specific public art archives in the country.

Within six months of launching a live version of his website (DetroitMurals.com) Viranel Clerard is now navigating the art world and bumping shoulders with political influencers. His work has been featured in The Detroit News, WDIV, Curbed, NBC News, Metro Times, BLAC Detroit, and more.

This years’ plenary will take the format of a live interview, with ample opportunity for audience questions. To facilitate the interview, we welcome Michael Smith, the Johanna Meijer Magoon Principal Archivist, Michigan Historical Collections at the Bentley Historical Library.


Thursday April 4, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Cabot Conference hotel

1:30pm

Vendor Fair
Discover the newest and best archival supplies, services and educational opportunities while you meet providers and talk to colleagues during the vendor fair on Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Fuel your conversation with refreshments while you visit the displays.

Thursday April 4, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Conference Hotel 400 Renaissance Dr W, Detroit, MI 48207, USA

3:00pm

Break
Thursday April 4, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Foyer

3:30pm

S102 Unlikely Teammates: Innovative and Creative Collaborations for Archives and Special Collections
Teamwork makes the dream work.  Archivists and special collections librarians can build successful partnerships with allied professionals or community groups to work together toward a common vision to ensure preservation, provide access, and increase usage of our holdings.

The purpose of the session is to demonstrate how archivists have formed (sometimes unlikely) partnerships and innovative collaborations to bring in new collections, develop new outreach and instruction initiatives, or to create new processes. Panelists will share successes and challenges in working with unlikely partners. With regard to intended outcomes, we hope that our panel can serve in part as a brainstorming session where ideas are sparked and the audience will leave with concrete takeaways for how they can begin to grow their own collaborations and become more ingrained in their local communities.
 
Content for this lightning round session will include presentations on collaborating to develop a course, create a video game for outreach, train students to process archival materials, create a formula for estimating processing costs, preserve the history of a university’s athletic department before it was lost, and create a long distance partnership between a university-based archives, community-run theater archives, and a digitization vendor in different corners of the country.

The intended audience includes archivists and special collections librarians of all skill levels, experience, and areas of practice who are searching for creative ideas for reaching out to different college or university units, community groups, and other repositories

Speakers
HB

Hope Bibens

Drake University
AA

April Anderson-Zorn

Illinois State University
SC

Sally Childs-Helton

Butler University
avatar for Jesse Hocking

Jesse Hocking

Archivist, Library of Congress
Folklife, Digital Accessioning
avatar for Lisa Huntsha

Lisa Huntsha

Archivist/Librarian, Swenson Swedish Immigration Research Center/Augustana College
CN

Cinda Nofziger

Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan
avatar for Gayle Schechter

Gayle Schechter

Program Associate, CLIR+DLF
-SAA SNAP (Students and New Archives Professionals) Chair
MD

Martina Dodd

Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library


Thursday April 4, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

3:30pm

S103 Going Digital, Now What?: Innovation in Online Access to Audiovisual Archives
Archives of all sizes have audiovisual materials in their holdings. Digitization is the first hurdle, but once a/v materials have been reformatted, archivists still face the daunting task of providing researchers with access to these valuable research materials.

This session will be a hybrid format where presenters will discuss projects utilizing innovative practices to provide online access to their audiovisual collections, despite challenges such as technology, resource availability, staffing, or rights.

Melissa Hernandez-Duran of the Bentley Historical Library will discuss the use of a non-CMS media platform to provide access to archival sound recordings according to rights determinations. Amy Moorman from the Archives of Iowa Broadcasting will talk about an NEH funded grant project to create an Online Media Library for their media collections, utilizing a CMS to attach audio and video access files. Matthew Patulski of Poplar Media will discuss a project to build an online archive for organizing media to document an 8-year river restoration project in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Derek Long of the Marr Sound Archives will discuss incorporating transcriptions into audio records to meet ADA compliance. Jon Cameron from Indiana University Libraries will talk about the work of providing access to the large volume of material digitized through IU’s Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative project.

Following those presentations, Lynn Smith of the Hoover Presidential Library will moderate a forum discussion between the panelists and the audience to discuss larger topics such as metadata standards, rights review, streaming files, web platforms, and more.

Chair
LS

Lynn Smith

Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum

Speakers
AM

Amy Moorman

Wartburg College
JC

Jon Cameron

Indiana University Libraries
MH

Melissa Hernandez-Duran

Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan
DL

Derek Long

University of Missouri-Kansas City Marr Sound Archives
MP

Matthew Patulski

Poplar Media


Thursday April 4, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Nicolet A&B

3:30pm

S101 Documenting the History of HIV/AIDS in the Midwest
Since the first reported cases of AIDS in the United States in 1981, national attention has tended to focus on the East and West Coasts, where urban areas with gay male populations, such as San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York, formed the front lines of the epidemic. The history of AIDS in the Midwest is less well known. Recent research and documentation projects are shedding light on this history, from the earliest reported cases, to shifting demographics in the 1990s, to community responses. The 2015 outbreak of HIV among IV drug users in Indiana reminds us that the history of AIDS continues to be written. Many of the issues associated with the earliest years of the epidemic—including fears about transmission, stigmatization, and controversies about safer sex education and needle exchange programs—endure. This panel will reflect on activities at four institutions to collect and share this history. Panelists will discuss the Wisconsin HIV/AIDS History Project, an oral history initiative; the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis’s acquisition of the Ryan White Papers and recent digitization efforts; a community-led exhibition HIV/AIDS and the Black Community in St. Louis; and a collaboration between academic faculty and archivists to show how the city of Toledo’s reaction to the AIDS epidemic differs from those on the coasts.

This session encourages archives to preserve and present materials despite controversy and to ensure that LGBTQ, racial/ethnic minorities, and other at-risk communities are included in the historical record. It is aimed at archivists at all levels.

Chair
MD

Michael Doylen

Chair, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries

Speakers
CC

Christian Carron

The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis
AD

Ally Day

University of Toledo, Department of Disability Studies
MR

Miranda Rectenwald

Washington University in St. Louis, University Libraries
LW

Lauren White

University of Toledo Libraries


Thursday April 4, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

5:30pm

Opening Reception
The opening reception will take place at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, one of the country’s preeminent institutions dedicated to the collection, preservation, and display of materials documenting African American culture. Light food and drinks will be served, along with a cash bar, in the Wright’s dramatic atrium, and you will be able to visit the museum’s many galleries.

Buses will transport you to the event on a rolling basis beginning at 5:15 pm.


Thursday April 4, 2019 5:30pm - 8:30pm
Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History 315 East Warren at Brush Street in Detroit Michigan, 48201
 
Friday, April 5
 

8:00am

Poster Sessions
This year’s poster sessions will offer you the opportunity to see projects and research conducted by both students and seasoned professionals. Poster presenters will be on hand to discuss their work during the Friday morning and afternoon breaks.  

P01 - Boxes, Boxes, Everywhere: Transforming Acquisition Practices and Workflows at Northwestern University Libraries
Brittan Nannenga, Northwestern University Libraries

P02- Curating Community Digital Collections: Digital Preservation in Small Cultural Heritage Institutions
Kristina Warner and Jessica Behrman, University of Wisconsin-Madison

P03 - In the Trenches of Transcription: Untold World War I Stories Revealed 
Lily Birkhimer and Jillian Ramage, Ohio History Connection

P04 - History Harvest: The "Sounds of Eau Claire" Model 
Karyssa Gulish, Elizabeth Schmidt, and Greg Kocken, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

P05 - Michigan Black History Bibliography Project
Nathaniel Arndts and Belle Teesdale, Wayne State University

P06 - On the Books: Jim Crow and Algorithms of Resistance 
Nathan Kelber, UNC Chapel Hill

P07 - From Catalogue to Catalog: Art Exhibition Catalogues as Archival Record
Hilary Severyn,  University of Michigan

P08 - MPLP: From Practice to Theory 
Kyna Herzinger, University of Louisville

P09 - Integrated Organization: Processing 500 feet of Special Collection Materials in Under 18 Months 
Donica Martin, The Urbana Free Library; Angela Solis, University of Illinois

P10 - "Would You Like to Save the Game?" Issues in Video Game Preservation and Archiving
Peter Wagner, Monica Hunasikatti, University of Wisconsin-Madison

P11- Translation Description and Metadata in Large Institutions: Lessons from the Wars of Imperial Japan Digitization Project
Eric Buckenmeyer, University of Wisconsin-Madison,

P12 - A Historical Look at Protest Culture in Ann Arbor
Meredith Counts, Alexandria Rayburn, Reine Patterson, Tony Sexton, University of Michigan

P13 - Processing the Records of Sex Therapist Dr. Gina Ogden
Jack Kovaleski, Indiana University

P14 - Student Memory, Then and Now 
Rena Newman and Cat Phan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

P15 - Implementing Updated Records Management Standards at the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History and Its Implications for Similar Institutions 
Mark Ramirez, University of Michigan

Speakers
BN

Brittan Nannenga

Northwestern University Libraries
KW

Kristina Warner

University of Wisconsin-Madison
JB

Jessica Behrman

University of Wisconsin-Madison
LB

Lily Birkhimer

Ohio History Connection
JR

Jillian Ramage

Ohio History Connection
GK

Greg Kocken

University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
KG

Karyssa Gulish

University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
ES

Elizabeth Schmidt

University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
NA

Nathaniel Arndts

Wayne State University
BT

Belle Teesdale

Wayne State University
NK

Nathan Kelber

UNC Chapel Hill
HS

Hilary Severyn

The University of Michigan
KH

Kyna Herzinger

University of Louisville
DM

Donica Martin

The Urbana Free Library
AS

Angela Solis

University of Illinois
PW

Peter Wagner

University of Wisconsin-Madison
MH

Monica Hunasikatti

University of Wisconsin-Madison
EB

Eric Buckenmeyer

University of Wisconsin-Madison
MC

Meredith Counts

University of Michigan
AR

Alexandria Rayburn

University of Michigan
RP

Reine Patterson

University of Michigan
TS

Tony Sexton

University of Michigan
JK

Jack Kovaleski

Indiana University
RN

Rena Newman

University of Wisconsin-Madison
CP

Cat Phan

University of Wisconsin-Madison
MR

Mark Ramirez

University of Michigan


Friday April 5, 2019 8:00am - 3:30pm
Foyer

8:15am

S201 Collaborating With On-Campus Museums: The Good, the Bad, and the GLAMorous
The Atlanta University Center (AUC) Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) Center for Collaborative Teaching & Learning provides faculty training in object-based pedagogy through the integration of artwork, artifacts, and other primary sources into course curriculum. This collaboration between three autonomous institutions: the Woodruff Library’s Archives Research Center (ARC), the Clark Atlanta University Art Museum and the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, is developing teaching and learning methods to improve visual and archival literacy among AUC faculty and students. A primary component of this initiative is the GLAM Centers digital portal, providing virtual access to images from across the GLAM institutions collections as well as educational resources. The GLAM portal serves as a common platform to find images from all GLAM institution collections in order to promote cross-disciplinary research by curating digital exhibitions in conjunction with physical exhibits, encouraging student interaction with art and archival materials.

GLAMs Museum Education Curator, Martina Dodd, Digital Exhibitions Coordinator, Gayle Schechter, and the Woodruff ARCs Public Services Archivist, Tiffany Atwater, will discuss important lessons learned from collaborating across multiple institutions to build the first three exhibits featured in the portal on the topics of African-American military service, voting rights, and artwork featuring black domestic life. In building a faculty outreach program, teaching in-class sessions in the museum and archives, and building a digital portal, GLAM has increased visibility and discoverability of the cultural heritage resources housed across the institutions of the AUC, the world's largest consortia of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Chair
avatar for Gayle Schechter

Gayle Schechter

Program Associate, CLIR+DLF
-SAA SNAP (Students and New Archives Professionals) Chair

Speakers
MD

Martina Dodd

Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library
TA

Tiffany Atwater

Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library


Friday April 5, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

8:15am

S202 Beyond Scholarly Work: The Use of Archives in/for Community Work
The sesquicentennial celebrations (2017-2018) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign prompted much delayed recognition of African American citizens. Aiming to bridge a noticeable gap, the University funded a series of projects documenting contributions of the Black community amidst great apathy and discrimination locally  (early to mid 1900s). In September 2017, the University released a documentary detailing the experiences of Black students as they struggled to find accommodations and eating facilities on campus; this led to a mapping project, which identified these students living quarters off-campus. At the sesquicentennial closing (August 2018), the University and local communities acknowledged the contributions of an outstanding African American man who, having earned the trust of several Illinois Presidents, intervened in favor of Black students. All projects drew heavily from the University Archives, and, all were informed by community members.

The speakers on this panel, individually, were key authors, presenters, and organizers in these community recognitions. Two of them composed dissertations on the Black experience, which were crucial input for the Illinois mapping project developed by the third presenter. Their research spans a twenty-year period, encompassing three distinct disciplines, History and Archival Studies, Education, and Writing Studies. Through this multidisciplinary perspective, they explore their community engagements and use of various archives and methods in excavating early African American histories. Collaboratively, they emphasize the applicability of archival research in the crafting of stories about/with underrepresented populations. Ultimately, their talk illustrates the importance of scholarly and community collaborations anchored in archival work, memory, and overlooked rhetors.

Chair
DC

Deirdre Cobb-Roberts

Chair, University of South Florida

Speakers
VR

Vanessa Rouillon

James Madison University
JB

Jessica Ballard

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Friday April 5, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Nicolet A&B

8:15am

S203 Breaking out of the box: Transforming archival collections and workflows through collaborative description projects
Archivists and archival collections can often be siloed into the “special” corner of their parent library: under described, underutilized, and often even unknown. Finding a path out of isolation may require taking a new look at collection management needs and considering new partners in the work. Collaboration with colleagues can result in positive ripple effects that extend beyond the initial project goals. This session will highlight three innovative description projects where archivists partnered with non-archivists to improve access to targeted collections and will detail how their collaborations transformed their archival collections, work structures and relationships, and, ultimately, their users. To foster audience participation, each person will be given a brainstorming worksheet they can use to consider their own potential collaborations.  A conversation about possibilities can be initiated during the question and answer period, and/or depending on interest, can be continued as a virtual discussion with the presenters and other audience members after the face-to-face conference concludes.  What underutilized collections in your repository are just waiting for that perfect combination of excitement and expertise to blossom into wonderful research resources? Which person down the hall from you, in the next cubicle, or in a separate building could be your next transformation partner?

Chair
RB

Ruth Bryan

University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center

Speakers
RH

Rachel Howard

University of Louisville Archives and Special Collections
CC

Cindy Cline

University of Kentucky Libraries
LH

Libby Hertenstein

Bowling Green State University Libraries Rachel Howard, University of Louisville Archives & Special Collections
RP

Rebecca Pattillo

University of Louisville Archives & Special Collections
LS

Lindy Smith

Music Library and Bill Schurk Sound Archives, Bowling Green State University Libraries


Friday April 5, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Mackinac Ballroom

8:30am

Vendor Fair
Discover the newest and best archival supplies, services and educational opportunities while you meet providers and talk to colleagues during the vendor fair on Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Fuel your conversation with refreshments while you visit the displays.

Friday April 5, 2019 8:30am - 3:30pm
Foyer

9:15am

S301 How to win at diversity and influence archivists
I have two words for you: inclusion rider. Archivists recognize the importance of making the archives field more inclusive, but not everyone has funds dedicated to developing large projects. What ideas can be implemented to increase ethnic diversity in the archives field, without costing an enormous amount of time, energy, and resources? In this presentation, panelists will share examples of relatively small-scale projects that might inspire you to create opportunities for equity within your own institution or local community.

Hoping that you will be able to take away some ideas, our speakers will present on the following projects: 1) an internship program that provides undergraduate and graduate students with practical experience in archival institutions with collections documenting African Americans; 2) library-led programs for students of color that focus on the importance of representation in cultural heritage settings and provide students with opportunities to create memory books, record oral histories, and explore archival materials; and 3) a local scholarship program that raised funds from fellow archivists to promote awareness about the need for diversity in the archives field.

Chair
avatar for Jennifer Ho

Jennifer Ho

The Chicago Community Trust
During the day, I serve as the archivist for The Chicago Community Trust. I'm also the founder of Lawrence & Argyle, an apparel company that celebrates and supports America's immigrant heritage. I am a proud member of the Chinese American Service League Associate Board.

Speakers
RF

Raquel Flores-Clemons

Vice Chairperson, Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMC), University Archivist and Director of Archives, Records Management, and Special Collections at Chicago State University
HI

Harrison Inefuku

Iowa State University


Friday April 5, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

9:15am

S302 Innovative Entertainment Outreach
"Entertainment" and "Archives" are two words that most people, even archivists, are unlikely to pair together. The panelists will discuss various creative programs presented by university archives, a corporate archives, and a public library archives that have raised awareness of their institutions and have reached people in the community who otherwise would not consider attending Archives programs, have no immediate research needs, or are unfamiliar with Archives altogether.

Heather Stecklein will present ways that she integrates her Stouts Secrets Campus Walking Tour into existing departmental retreats, Homecoming events, and professional development initiatives. Megan Atkinson will present her exhibit at the Putnam County Fair and the Preservation Station for digitization of patrons’ obsolete formats. M. Nathalie Wheaton will present her experiences surrounding the demolition of four historic buildings on her institutions campus, which culminated in a well-attended and live-streamed event featuring the opening of four time capsules. Scott Brouwer will present Dark La Crosse, a popular suite of programs highlighted by an annual stage production with new researched content each year that features the seedier side of his city’s rich cultural history.

The panelists will also discuss what types of activities have worked well and which have not; the amount of effort, time, money, and administrative goodwill required; the collaborations with their communities that make the programs possible; and how the programs benefit current patrons, potential patrons, and their own institutions.

Chair
SB

Scott Brouwer

La Crosse Public Library Archives

Speakers
avatar for Heather Stecklein

Heather Stecklein

UW-Stout Archives and Area Research Center
Heather J. Stecklein is the Director of the UW-Stout Archives and Area Research Center in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Her most recent campus initiatives have focused heavily on preservation of born digital collections and expanding the university's primary source instruction program... Read More →
MA

Megan Atkinson

Tennessee Tech University Archives and Special Collections
MN

M. Nathalie Wheaton

Rush University Medical Center Archives


Friday April 5, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Nicolet A&B

9:15am

S303 Overheard in the Stacks: Candid Conversations on Project Management
The ability to successfully manage a project is becoming increasingly important to the livelihood of archival institutions as we attempt to respond to institutional changes in innovative ways. A well-managed project can have transformative effects on not just a  collection of materials, but on archivists and institutions as well. This lightning session will present a variety of project management case studies or current experiences. Presenters will share successful stories, or experiences that served as learning opportunities. After all presenters have spoken for three to five minutes, the session will open to you [the audience] to provide either sympathy or an innovative solution of your own.
Topics include:
  • Finding aid migration projects
  • Collaborating with student workers and/or outside stakeholders
  • Managing a large, multi-year processing project as a project archivist
  • Balancing act of adding outreach into a processing grant
  • A large scale collection relocation project including a wide variety of special collections material
  • Using Basecamp and other project management tools to manage  a variety of projects (digitization, ASpace migration, book publishing, etc.)

Chair
avatar for Rosalie Gartner

Rosalie Gartner

Lead Processing Archivist, Iowa State University Special Collections & University Archives

Speakers
CM

Caitlin Moriarty,

University of Michigan. Bentley Historical Library
EB

Ed Busch

Michigan State University Archives and Historical Collections
avatar for Kathryn Hujda

Kathryn Hujda

Manuscripts Curator, Minnesota Historical Society
Kathryn Hujda is the Curator of Manuscripts at the Minnesota Historical Society. She specializes in working with artist archives with a particular interest in collection donor relations.
CW

Caitlin Wells

University of Michigan Library, Special Collections Research Center
SR

Shae Rafferty

Wayne State University, Walter P. Reuther Library
EC

Elizabeth Carron

University of Michigan. Bentley Historical Library
avatar for Bethany Davis

Bethany Davis

University of Iowa Libraries


Friday April 5, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Mackinac Ballroom

10:00am

Break
Enjoy some refreshments, visit the vendor fair and chat with poster session presenters.  

Friday April 5, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Foyer

10:30am

S401 Computer-Assisted Appraisal of Electronic Records
Despite a couple decades of progress on various technologies to support both digital preservation and archival description, we've still seen relatively little progress on software support for the core activities of selection and appraisal.  There are numerous data elements within born-digital materials that could (but currently aren't) be used to support more effective and efficient appraisal processes.  Recent advances in natural language processing and machine learning are particularly promising. Appraisal isn't a specific point in a digital curation workflow but is instead something that happens at numerous points throughout the process.  The time is ripe for detailed discussions about how and when to introduce software that can support appraisal activities.

This panel - composed of individuals from four states and a variety of institution types -- will explore issues of computer-assisted appraisal.  What are archivists doing now, and what could they be doing in the future?  What types of software are the most promising?  What are the most likely challenges? The purpose of the session is to raise awareness of the potential for computer-assisted appraisal, as well as helping participants (panelists and audience) to understand the implications for work in their own institutions. This panel should be of interest to all archivists responsible for electronic records, especially born-digital records.  No background knowledge is required, though an understanding of archival appraisal principles and practices will be beneficial.

Chair
CL

Christopher Lee

University of North Carolina

Speakers
JK

Joanne Kaczmarek

Director of Records and Information Management Services and Archivist for Electronic Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
LA

Laura Alagna

Northwestern University
ME

Max Eckard

Bentley Historical Society, University of Michigan
avatar for Megan Rohleder

Megan Rohleder

Senior Archivist of Public Services, Kansas Historical Society


Friday April 5, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

10:30am

S402 No free kittens: turning acquisition headaches into positive experiences
There’s no such thing as free kittens: one person’s gift is another’s burden.  Without disclosing particular details (and a request for no recording of the session), archivists on this panel will share “learning opportunities” of when accepting donations became more than they bargained for: whether it was a case of extensive donor-imposed restrictions, a tale of opaque rightful ownership, or when collections became exponentially costly in terms of space, labor, and sanity. The intended outcome is to provide archivists and archival repository administrators with concrete examples to emphasize the importance of well documented acquisition procedures, so they can better handle scenarios which may arise in their own institutions, and offer attendees an opportunity to share their own experiences.

Chair
LT

Lydia Tang

Chair, Michigan State University

Speakers
SC

Sally Childs-Helton

Butler University
EL

Elisa Landaverde

Michigan State University
CB

Cara Bertram

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday April 5, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

10:30am

S403 Community Webs: Empowering Public Librarians to Create Community History Web Archives
Public libraries are a vital resource for preserving the history of their communities. Key portions of the contemporary historical record now reside online, but few public libraries actively curate web archive collections. In 2017, the Internet Archive received IMLS funding to provide education, training, and services to enable public libraries to develop expertise in web archiving and build collections documenting their local communities. The resulting resources will be made publicly available to other institutions interested in pursuing web archiving programs.

In this session, we will discuss how we are approaching the curatorial and outreach challenges related to building special collections representative of the diverse populations we serve. How do we select web-based content that has enduring value? What role can we play in preserving the web presence of our community? Who will use our web archives and how should they be organized? What kinds of relationships and agreements should we pursue with content creators? How can public libraries gain the expertise, and what insights can we share?
 
This session will discuss the goals, successes, and challenges of the grant after the first year. Panelists will speak to the issues involved in collecting and preserving the digital history of their communities. Audience members will be invited to share their experiences sparking ideas and dialogue about best practices. This session is for any institution that is considering or already engaging in web archiving. No knowledge of or experience with web archives is needed.

Chair
AV

Anke Voss

The Urbana Free Library

Speakers
LD

Lori Donovan

Internet Archive
CE

Chatham Ewing

Cleveland Public Library
PK

Paul Kelly

DC Public Library
JT

Julie Tabberer

Grand Rapids Public Library


Friday April 5, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Nicolet A&B

12:15pm

Archives Advocacy in the Halls of Democracy
In August 2018, 65 archivists met with the staffs of 47 US senators and representatives in Washington, DC, as part of the Archives on the Hill (AOH) advocacy event. This was the first-ever coordinated effort by archival organizations to draw attention to the value of archives and the work of archivists. Whether you are a seasoned advocate or thinking about getting involved, come and engage with a few of the AOH participants and discuss strategies for what each of us can do to gain support for archives and make a lasting impact with legislators and government officials at the federal, state, and local levels.

Speakers
avatar for Collette McDonough

Collette McDonough

Kettering Foundation, Kettering Foundation
Collette McDonough is an archivist at the Kettering Foundation. Her main responsibilities include processing the foundation’s collections: conducting essential low-level conservation, creating inventories, preparing collection guides, and adding and updating records in the foundation’s... Read More →
KR

Kathleen Roe

(Retired), New York State Archives
BW

Bryan Whitledge

Central Michigan University


Friday April 5, 2019 12:15pm - 1:00pm
Nicolet A&B

12:15pm

Bring MAC to Your Community! How to Propose a MAC Annual Meeting, Symposium, or Speakers Bureau Event
Want MAC to come to your town? Hosting an Annual Meeting, Symposium, or a Speakers Bureau event/workshop is a rewarding experience that gives you a chance to show off your corner of the MAC region as well as to provide a great benefit to your local archival community. Join current and past MAC vice presidents and organizers of recent MAC meetings and workshops to learn what it takes to bring MAC to YOU!

Speakers
MB

Megan Badgley-Malone

Michigan State University
ME

Mary Ellen Ducey

University of Nebraska
EM

Erik Moore

University of Minnesota
avatar for Joshua Ranger

Joshua Ranger

University Archivist, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh


Friday April 5, 2019 12:15pm - 1:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

12:15pm

Networking and the Job Search: Learning to Love It
Does the thought of networking make you uneasy? You are not alone! Self-promotion and the entire job search process make many of us tense. Come share your experiences, suggestions, and successes, along with your fears and concerns. The discussion will be led by three people sharing different experiences and perspectives: an archival educator, an archivist with experience on hiring committees, and a student and steering committee member of SAA’s Students and New Archival Professionals (SNAP) Section. Students, new professionals, and more experienced professionals are all encouraged to attend.

Speakers
AV

Anke Voss

The Urbana Free Library
HC

Heidi Charles

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
SP

Scott Pitol

University of Illinois at Chicago


Friday April 5, 2019 12:15pm - 1:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

1:15pm

S502 My Comeback Story: Overcoming Imposter Syndrome in the Archival Profession
Imposter syndrome.  We’ve all had it.  Whether new to the profession or long-time archivists, we’ve all had that patron, that donor, or simply a moment where we’ve thought, Am I cut out for this?  In the style of lightning talks, this session will feature short stories from panelists who range in diversity regarding career experience, institution type, and cultural background. These stories seek to start the conversation in our profession by openly discussing their imposter moment, how it impacted their career and their learning experience.  By opening up the discussion to the audience, the session hopes to reduce imposter syndrome and help create a more inclusive profession.

Chair
AA

April Anderson-Zorn

Illinois State University

Speakers
AD

Amber Dushman

American Medical Association
RM

Rebekah McFarland

Sisters of the Living Word
DN

Danielle Nowak

The Morton Arboretum-Sterling Morton Library
BM

Beth Myers

Smith College Special Collections
avatar for Jennifer Ho

Jennifer Ho

The Chicago Community Trust
During the day, I serve as the archivist for The Chicago Community Trust. I'm also the founder of Lawrence & Argyle, an apparel company that celebrates and supports America's immigrant heritage. I am a proud member of the Chinese American Service League Associate Board.
BL

Beth Loch

Chicago Public Library
AS

Allison Stankrauff

Wayne State University
BF

Britt Farley

African-American Research Library and Cultural Center


Friday April 5, 2019 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Nicolet A&B

1:15pm

S501 Collaborate and Listen
Under the direction of Robert Wicks, Director of the Miami University Art Museum, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology (GBL) at Indiana University and the Kansas City Kansas Public Library are collaborating with the Wyandotte Nation to assemble digital versions of primary historical sources documenting the Huron/Wyandot experience across the Midwest. The documents will be collected from public and private archives, libraries, museums, historical societies, and collections across the United States and elsewhere. The digital images of these will be compiled with searchable transcriptions and commentaries to be accessed as the Wyandot History Digital Archive (WHDA). Physically, each of these collections are separate; organized and described differently. Metadata standards do not wholly represent the native experience or narrative. Panelists will describe their collections and then discuss policy, editorial standards, and workflow processes for this collaborative platform.

Chair
KG

Kelsey Grimm

Indiana University

Speakers
RW

Robert Wicks

Miami University
AL

Anne Lacey

Kansas City, Kansas Public Library


Friday April 5, 2019 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

1:15pm

S503 Reach Out! I’ll Be There: Four Institutional Approaches to Transparency and Access
Challenges of transparency and accessibility are universal across the public history profession and university archives. This session will explore the importance of openness and transparency while highlighting the need for proper records management and knowledge of open records laws. Each institution regardless of size must respect the trust and faith their key stakeholders have in how their budgets, taxes, and donations are spent. Researchers, students, genealogists, government agencies, university administrators, and other groups are actively using our resources. Without proper guidance and policies, libraries, archives, and museums could face backlash on either too much accessibility or too little transparency. Panelists will discuss how their individual outreach efforts serve as powerful tools for guidance, collaboration, and relationship building in their roles as archivists and librarians. Through proper training and policies organizations can protect the trust of the public and records creators while also protecting the privacy of individuals and donors.

This panel of archivists and librarians working in state, local, and academic institutions will provide specific practical tips and insight into various outreach efforts including
records management training to records creators and managers, records management
surveys specific to experiences with digital records, and public instruction. The
panel will share the challenges, rewards, outcomes, and lessons learned along
the way as we all strive to better serve and provide for our patrons and stakeholders.

Speakers
RL

Ryan Leimkuehler

Kansas State University
AW

Amanda Wahlmeier

Johnson County Library
avatar for Megan Rohleder

Megan Rohleder

Senior Archivist of Public Services, Kansas Historical Society
avatar for Scott Kirycki

Scott Kirycki

Digital Archivist, University of Notre Dame
As the Digital Archivist at Notre Dame, I develop and implement policies, procedures, and workflows for records retention and the appraisal, ingest, and preservation of born-digital University records.


Friday April 5, 2019 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

2:15pm

S601 Searching for Buried Gardens: Indiana University Campus Archaeology and Archives at Wylie House Museum
In the summer of 2018, an archaeology field school conducted four weeks of excavation on the property of the Wylie House Museum, the 1835 home of the first president of Indiana University on the Bloomington campus. The students in the course dug four features within a twenty square meter area in search of the Wylie family’s 19th century subterranean cold-frame greenhouses. These buried garden pits, as the family called them, are identified in a variety of family artifacts, from a couple of early photographs to a grandson’s memory map of the property and an 1888 school writing piece.

Research into the Wylie archival collections led the museum director and university archaeologists to propose a multi-year, grant-funded project that includes both physical and online exhibits, historic archaeology courses, community archaeology experiences, and a symposium to encourage campus archaeologists across the state to conduct archaeology projects in conjunction with campus archivists, librarians, and historians.

This session will provide attendees with an overview of the project from the perspective of both the museum director and the doctoral archaeology student that led the field school. Presenters will discuss the ways in which this project allowed archaeologists and archivists to work together, learn from each other, and provide students and community members with unique learning experiences. Attendees will learn how the archival documents were key to this project's student experience, cross-campus collaboration, and project funding.

Chair
CB

Carey Beam

Chair, Wylie House Museum, Indiana University

Speakers
MM

Molly Mesner

Anthropology Department, Indiana University


Friday April 5, 2019 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

2:15pm

S602 #Archives4BlackLives: Archivists Respond to Black Lives Matter
Archives For Black Lives in Philadelphia (A4BLiP) is a loose association of archivists, librarians, and allied professionals in the area responding to the issues raised by the Black Lives Matter movement. As a group that is primarily white, we seek to push white archivists to deconstruct white supremacy in their archives and within the profession. In this session, A4BLiP organizers will present about some of the projects the group has embarked upon so far: publishing a statement of principles advocating for just policies around records of police violence, affirming the importance of documenting Black lives in the historical record, and acknowledging the need to make the archival profession more inclusive of archivists of color; processing community-based archival collections and seeking opportunities to advise organizations serving Black communities on archival and records management questions; and devising standards for anti-oppressive archival description and procedures for auditing repositories description for racist language. This will lead in to a discussion about ways archivists can work to ensure that Black Lives Matter in the archival record, in the archival profession, and in society writ large. We are proud of our successes but also aware of potential pitfalls in the road ahead. Our goal is to hear ideas and understand concerns from archivists in the Midwestern region to inform our work in Philadelphia. We also hope is to spark interest in establishing sister groups nationwide.

Chair
FC

Faith Charlton

Chair, Princeton University Library

Speakers
CC

Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
AA

Alexia Antracoli

Princeton University Library


Friday April 5, 2019 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Nicolet A&B

2:15pm

S603 Opening the Door to the Closed Stacks: When the Archives Joins the Community
As the preservation of cultural artifacts gains greater public attention, many community groups have sought consultation or partnership with archival institutions. Community participation in archival collecting has positive potential to transform collecting initiatives through the inclusion of materials from previously underrepresented groups.  Many of these groups, however, may not be content to merely deposit their legacy at a known repository. Instead, they seek ongoing collaboration in the process of gathering materials or connecting archives to local people and places.
These intricate partnerships can also lead to areas of confusion. Potential donors from the community of interest may wonder: Who did I just donate my stuff to, the archives or the community group? Who controls my stuff, the active community or the archive? Community organizations/partners may wonder: What can this Archives institution do that we cant do? Why do we need them, and are they usurping our place or our voice in the community?
Panel members from different types of archival repositories and working with different communities will discuss their experiences balancing the expectations of complex constituencies and the best practices of their profession. They will share their strategies for educating community members about archival processes, sharing and communicating each groups priorities, asking for community input, facilitating creative productions by the community, and managing trickling accruals and third party (or DIY) digitization or grant participants. This panel is geared towards archivists engaged in donor relations, community relationship-building, and those who are looking to expand their collecting scope in collaborative ways.

Chair
avatar for Kate Dietrick

Kate Dietrick

Archivist, Upper Midwest Jewish Archives, University of Minnesota

Speakers
MM

Michelle McCoy

Special Collections and Preservation Division, Chicago Public Library
RS

Rebecca Skirvin

Oesterle Library, North Central College
avatar for Laurie Lee Moses

Laurie Lee Moses

Archivist/Digital Librarian, Center for Black Music Research, Columbia College Chicago
open source software, NoSQL databases, finding aids (LOL)


Friday April 5, 2019 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

3:00pm

Break
Enjoy some refreshments, visit the vendor fair and chat with poster session presenters.  

Friday April 5, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Foyer

3:30pm

MAC Members Meeting
Please join us for the all-important Members Meeting. Here you will be able to learn about MAC recent developments and activities, as well as take part in the recognition of your MAC peers. President David McCartney will present his farewell “State of MAC” address and you can learn about upcoming meetings in Fargo and Des Moines.

Speakers
DM

David McCartney

President, MAC


Friday April 5, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Cabot Conference hotel

6:00pm

Restaurant Tours
This year’s conference will feature two special themed restaurant tours, a spotlight on business archives and a Metro Detroit Archivist League (MEDAL) mixer. Stay tuned for more details!

Detroit downtown is bustling with restaurants representing a unique blend of traditional ethnic and new cuisine. Join LAC members as they guide to some of their favorite eateries.  Sign-up sheets will be posted near the registration area Wednesday-Friday.  Groups will meet in the lobby at 5:45PM.

Friday April 5, 2019 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Conference Hotel 400 Renaissance Dr W, Detroit, MI 48207, USA
 
Saturday, April 6
 

8:15am

S703 Navigating the IT Landscape in the Archives: Collaborations, Struggles and Successes
Information technology within the archival landscape is constantly evolving, and for many has become an integral part of the everyday workload. Collaborating with information technology experts can mean a whole host of options.  This session will explore different collaborative projects involving information technology and/or IT professionals, revealing a range of possible collaborations, challenges, and solutions.
Organization-wide projects to develop and implement systems, solutions learned to navigate a wide variety of IT structures within a single organization, and individual collaborations with fellow librarians and archivists will be discussed. Challenges include the use of proprietary vs. open-source systems; roadblocks faced when information technology goals hamper archivists’ views of progress; and restrictive computer permissions forcing a reliance on internal IT professionals. Presenters will discuss various forms of collaborations including working with a metadata librarian to achieve linked data and description goals; negotiating with IT and campus offices to balance standards and accessibility with speedy resolutions; and combining information technology with cataloging and technical services and the benefits this structure provides. Participants will come away with ideas for navigating the IT landscape(s) within their own institutions - and if the obvious path does not work, workarounds colleagues have devised to more efficiently reach their goals. The session will conclude by opening the floor to the audience to share solutions or how they have successfully addressed their own information technology challenges.

Chair
LS

Laura Sullivan

Iowa State University

Speakers
avatar for Lara Friedman-Shedlov

Lara Friedman-Shedlov

Description and Access Archivist, University of Minnesota
Lara Friedman-Shedlov is Description and Access Archivist for the Kautz Family YMCA Archives, a unit of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries. For the past 15+ years, her work has focused primarily on the challenges of making archival... Read More →
JB

Jaime Bourassa

Missouri Historical Society
avatar for Jennifer Johnson

Jennifer Johnson

Corporate Archives Director, Cargill Incorporated
Jennifer Johnson is the Director of the Corporate Archives at Cargill, Incorporated. A University of Maryland graduate, she previously worked at the U.S. Department of Energy and the Minnesota State Archives. Jennifer has held leadership positions with SAA, MAC, and TCART, and is... Read More →


Saturday April 6, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Mackinac Ballroom

8:15am

S702 Transforming Access and Promotion through the Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) provides an innovative platform to expand awareness and encourage use of archival collections across the MAC region. Speakers from three repositories and a representative from a DPLA state hub discuss sharing digital objects with a national audience and explore the impact of participating in a DPLA Hub.
DPLA is transforming archives through technological change and collaboration with DPLA improves discoverability and accessibility, expands the digital representation of diverse communities, creates value across the network, and encourages the use of historical materials by a wider range of scholars, teachers, students, and the general public.
Speakers will highlight several projects and collaborations across three states. A project underway at Wayne State University to digitize collections from underserved communities includes a new statewide digital portal for the Michigan Hub and educational tools for the cultural content. Marquette University will discuss its work in the consultant network for the Wisconsin Hub and its collaboration with the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee to assist smaller repositories seeking to build capacity and engage digital projects. As one of DPLAs initial service hubs, the Minnesota Digital Library (MDL) will discuss how its premier project, Minnesota Reflections, encourages new uses of digital collections and assists organizations of all sizes to increase capacity for digital literacy.

Chair
EN

Erik Nordberg

Wayne State University

Speakers
RA

Richard Adler

Michigan DPLA Service Hub
AC

Amy Cooper Cary

Marquette University
avatar for Molly Huber

Molly Huber

Outreach Coordinator, Minnesota Digital Library / Minitex
Molly Huber joined the Minnesota Digital Library (MDL) in 2014, having previously worked at the Minnesota Historical Society and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. She holds a B.A from the University of Massachusetts and an M.A from the University of South Carolina. As MDL’s Outreach... Read More →


Saturday April 6, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Nicolet A&B

8:15am

S701 The Rainbow Connection: Capturing LGBTQ+ Stories in Wisconsin Through Community Partnerships
The University Archives at UW-Madison hold a unique and ever growing community archive that documents the LGBTQ+ community in Dane County, WI, where Madison is located. What started out as an oral history project in 2007, the archive began collecting physical materials, audio/video, photographic media, and other ephemera in the fall of 2015. Realizing this was an important community/university partnership, an advisory group was formed and is now made up of community members (many of which are artists, social justice advocates, and community organizers), staff, faculty, and students. To date, the majority of the collection development, donor relations, and fundraising is spearheaded and executed by the community members of the advisory group, while the care and maintenance of the collections is handled by the archives staff and students. The presenters, the University Archivist and the Processing Archivist, will discuss the unique model of having a community advisory group manage, fundraise, and do collection development for a community archive. Additionally, we will discuss the origins of the community archive (including historic and ongoing fraught relationships between the University and the LGBTQ+ community in Madison), overall challenges and opportunities, collection strengths and gaps, and strategies for programming and fundraising. The LGBTQ+ archive is one of the many outreach initiatives within the University Archives that is designed to actively collect the stories of underserved populations and acquire missing stories from the University and the Dane County community. Moreover, the advisory group is a proven innovative collaboration that is becoming a well oiled machine and we’d like to share our recipe for success as well as lessons learned.

Chair
KN

Katie Nash

Chair, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Speakers
avatar for Alex Krensky

Alex Krensky

Processing Archivist, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Saturday April 6, 2019 8:15am - 9:00am
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

9:15am

S801 Transforming Museums Through Archives
More museums are developing their archives, or opening them to the public, for the first time, and as this trend continues, the unique role of being an archive within a museum expands. With that, new challenges and opportunities arise, making way for collaboration, creativity, and innovation. This standard presentation session will delve into some of these obstacles and outcomes, looking at how museum collections and cataloging policies can affect archives policies, and vice versa; how a founder's legacy can guide and overshadow work done in the archives, and ways to work with, and around, that legacy; and how the creation of new exhibits can lead to innovative thinking in regards to the use of archival materials, while considering the preservation needs of the documents. In looking at how archives work within and with museums, professionals at all institutions can gain insight into creating partnerships with underlying differing philosophies; working with and against an institution's legacy to more accurately reflect history and alter misconceptions; and working creatively to develop exhibits that engage visitors while protecting original documents. The unique position of being an archive within a museum has the possibility to transform how both units operate, and in the end, create more opportunities for engagement, outreach, and collaboration for the archives and the museum.

Chair
JU

Janice Unger

The Henry Ford

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Clark

Jennifer Clark

Gateway Arch National Park
JW

Julie Wroblewski

Chicago History Museum


Saturday April 6, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Mackinac Ballroom

9:15am

S802 Together, We Make It: Making Collections Featuring Minority Groups More Accessible
This session will describe ways to make hidden collections more accessible, especially collections that feature persons or works from minority groups such as African Americans.  Part of the session will describe the collaborative work of a Chicago-based African American lineage society to develop a photograph collection depicting African Americans who had formerly been slaves in the southern United States.   Participants will describe the collaboration between the International Society of Sons and Daughters of Slave Ancestry (ISDSA) and the Chicago State University Library to digitize, describe and make the Collection accessible online.   The Collection includes nearly 360 rare photographs and artwork (sketches, paintings, and drawings) depicting African Americans who had formerly been slaves in the southern United States.  The session will also include information on the Library of Congress' African American Subject Funnel Project in general, how it has progressed over the years, and how it can help librarians better describe and create access points for collections especially those focused on African Americans.

Chair
GP

Gayle Porter

Chicago State University

Speakers
PB

Pat Bearden

International Society of Sons and Daughters of Slave Ancestry
AH

Aaisha Haykal

Avery Research Center at College of Charleston
GP

Gemmicka Piper

Indiana University-Purdue University


Saturday April 6, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel

9:15am

S803 Transforming Outreach with Community Archives
Big archives. Small archives. Community societies. Grassroot collections. Regardless of the size and type, all archives work to preserve records that document the activities, history, and cultural heritage of their community. The success of their efforts depends on funding, staffing, training, and other resources. It has been common practice for larger, well-funded institutions to support community archives by acquiring records through the traditional donation process. But that cannot  and should not  always be the answer.
This panel explores how four archivists have engaged in efforts to provide archival services at the community-level. Topics examined will include the panelists successes and failures; the opportunities and ethical challenges presented when larger institutions work with smaller, underfunded archives; and the reasons why these professionals have decided to step across the unspoken boundaries between archives. Becca Smith will discuss the annual Day of Service volunteer projects by the Chicago Area Archivists over the past two years at both Pullman Historic Site and the American Indian Center. Sarah Dorpinghaus will present on free archives basics workshops offered to community-based organizations through the University of Kentucky. Sabrina Gorse and Rena Schergen will review archival volunteer service projects with professional archivists and graduate students in community archives throughout the St. Louis area.

Chair
RS

Rena Schergen

Chair, Archdiocese of St. Louis

Speakers
SG

Sabrina Gorse

Missouri Historical Society
SD

Sarah Dorpinghaus

University of Kentucky
avatar for Becca Smith

Becca Smith

Librarian/Archivist, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.


Saturday April 6, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
Nicolet A&B

10:00am

Break
Saturday April 6, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Foyer

10:30am

S902 Archiving Unheard Voices: Community-Based and Participatory Oral History Projects
Five oral history projects of diverse, “unheard” communities in Michigan will provide examples of ways to reach out to underserved populations and thus enrich the broader community. Three of these diverse communities are: 
  • “Gi-gikinomaage-min (We are all Teachers)” by Grand Valley State University records the memories and experiences of those individuals who lived through the Urban Relocation Program of American Indians and those who worked to build new Native American organizations, support structures, and community in urban spaces. 
  • "Arab Diaspora in Times of War" - Yemeni immigrant and Syrian refugee projects capture the unique experiences of youth and adults, and address the challenges of misconceptions of ethnic populations through personal stories, artistic expression and dialog. 
  • “Black Voices in the Copper Country,” investigates the social and cultural history of African Americans with collected oral histories by the Michigan Technological University Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. 
These projects involved coordinating with local organizations and academic institutions to promote a unique and innovative means of preserving a community’s cultural heritage through the authentic voice of oral histories.  Community archives are imagined as spaces where the community members and archivists can collaborate as equals, sharing and exchanging knowledge. However, many of the case studies presented in the literature uphold traditional relationships between archives and community, preserving the role of the institutional archive as the collector and preserver of community histories. Two of our presentations posit community archives, as archival projects that are initiated, controlled, and maintained by the members of a self-defined community. By this definition, community archives can be differentiated from participatory archives or community-focused initiatives more commonly described in the archival literature. This presentation will introduce the Transgender Oral History Project of Iowa and their digital archive as an example a community archive fully controlled and maintained by community members. Exemplifying the ability to queer the archive at the local level, the Transgender Oral History Project of Iowa offers a case study of how communities engaging in archival practice choose to protect and preserve their history. We emerge with new questions regarding the role of professional archivists when they serve as mentors, not protectors of the archive.

Speakers
CA

Camron Amin

University of Michigan-Dearborn
MS

Melanie Shell-Weiss

Grand Valley State University
TB

Tammy Barnes Apmann

Kalamazoo Valley Museum
LH

Lindsay Hiltunen

Michigan Technological University
AB

Aiden Bettine

History Dept, University of Iowa
avatar for Lindsay Mattock

Lindsay Mattock

Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Science, University of Iowa
Professor Mattock completed her doctorate at the University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences. She also holds a MLIS with a concentration in Archives, Preservation and Records Management and a BA in Film Studies. Her professional experience as a video-technician and training... Read More →


Saturday April 6, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Mackinac Ballroom

10:30am

S903 Archival Revitalization: Transforming Technical Services with Innovative Workflows
Technical services work is at the core of archives. Without these fundamentals, collections do not enter the archives and receive intellectual control (accessioning), are not arranged, described, and made accessible (processing), nor is applicable information about the collections retained for tracking purposes (collection management). In short, technical services processes enable collections to be discovered, accessed, and researched by our users, as well as promoted through outreach initiatives. However, these procedures and workflows do not remain static, and are constantly evolving, leading to archival revitalization.
Presenters will discuss the innovative workflows and procedures they implemented, describing how these new processes transformed their archives. Examples include Wayne State University Reuther Library’s budget-conscious addition of ArchivesSpace and Archivematica to its collections management, accessioning, and processing workflows and procedures; the effects of extensible processing on the Benson Ford Research Center’s collections, including associated outreach initiatives; Purdue Archives creation of a Campus-Archives Interactions Database, enhancing the sense of community between campus stakeholders and archives staff; the Ohio State University’s archival technical services departments transition to the allied IT professions methodology of Agile; the creation of Northwestern University’s Archival Processing unit and its innovative integration with other Distinctive Collections units; and the creation of innovative records assessment practices and accessioning workflows at the University of Michigan Bentley Historical Library. These examples of real world technical services workflows and procedures will provide audience members, both practitioners and managers, the background and details necessary to enable them to revitalize their own archives.

Speakers
avatar for Benn Joseph

Benn Joseph

Head of Archival Processing, Northwestern University
Benn Joseph currently serves as Head of Archival Processing at Northwestern University Libraries.
AA

Alexandra A. A. Orchard

Wayne State University
avatar for Adriana Harmeyer

Adriana Harmeyer

Archivist for University History, Purdue University Archives and Special Collections
CP

Cate Putirskis

Ohio State University Libraries
avatar for Olga Virakhovskaya

Olga Virakhovskaya

Lead Archivist for Collections Management, University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library
Olga oversees processing of collections in all formats, and develops archival description policies and workflows. Her professional interests include archival description, archival ethics and privacy issues, and linked data. Olga holds MLIS from the Southern Connecticut State Univ... Read More →
JU

Janice Unger

The Henry Ford


Saturday April 6, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Nicolet A&B

10:30am

S901 Light from the North: Reviving the Spirit of Archon through AtoM
The 2009 vision to merge Archon and Archivists Toolkit into a single open source archives content management system was bold, optimistic, and well-intentioned.  However, the result of that merger, ArchivesSpace, left many Archon users feeling excluded. The technical complexities of hosting a local instance, the exhaustive descriptive possibilities, and the steep learning curve all presented significant barriers to repositories accustomed to Archon’s ease of use.  Seeking a way forward, some United States repositories have begun using Access to Memory (AtoM), a Canadian open source standards-based archival content management system created in 2007.
Archivists representing four different professional settings -- a large university, a small college, a religious community, and a public library -- will share their reasons for choosing AtoM over other systems and their experiences implementing AtoM. Addressing both the strengths and shortcomings of the software, presenters will discuss the technical requirements for installation and hosting, data migration, customization options, multilingual description, and AtoM’s capacity to display and store digital assets.  Presenters will also talk about their experiences with support and programming services offered by Artefactual Systems Inc., the software development company serving as lead developer for AtoM.

Session attendees will learn about AtoMs basic functionality and become familiar enough with the software to evaluate its suitability for their repositories. The session requires no coding or systems management skills and is intended for professionals seeking to implement a user-friendly archival content management system.

Chair
CM

Colleen McFarland Rademaker

The Corning Museum of Glass

Speakers
JB

Jeremy Brett

Texas A&M University
DC

Doris Cardenas

Claretian Missionaries Archives USA-Canada
AT

Anne Thomason

Lake Forest College
NW

Nancy Webster

Highland Park Library


Saturday April 6, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Cadillac A&B Conference Hotel